Alexander comforting the dying Darius, from a 17th century Indian manuscript of Nizami's Book of Alexander. From the National Library of Israel collection (Ms. Yah. Ar. 1021)
רמדאן כרים
היכרות עם הדת המוסלמית והחברה הערבית

Alexander the Great in Islam. From Greek Conqueror to Muslim Prophet.

Sam Thrope, Ph.D., The National Library of Israel

Alexander the Great’s conquest of the known world lasted only eleven years from 334 to 323 BCE, but the legacy of that almost unbelievable achievement—building an empire stretching from Greece to India before the age of thirty—continued to reverberate throughout the centuries.

In the Islamic sphere, the portrayal of Alexander took a surprising and unexpected turn. Alexander’s figure is already hinted at in the Qur’an in the description of the “two-horned one." However, the later tradition, especially the work of medieval Persian poets, gives us an Alexander driven not by conquest but by justice; having attained perfect philosophical wisdom, the Macedonian warrior became a monotheistic prophet. This lecture will discuss the changing figure of Alexander from ancient Greece to Medieval Iran.

Samuel Thrope is the Curator of the Islam and Middle East Collection at the National Library of Israel. Born and raised in Arlington, Massachusetts, Thrope earned his PhD at the University of California, Berkeley, and has taught at the Hebrew University. His latest book is a translation, with Domenico Agostini, of the Zoroastrian creation myth the Bundahishn.

Mon
25.4.2022
25
ב
Apr
20:00
אירוע מקוון
Zoom
ללא תשלום
Free

עוד מסדרת 

רמדאן כרים

Alexander comforting the dying Darius, from a 17th century Indian manuscript of Nizami's Book of Alexander. From the National Library of Israel collection (Ms. Yah. Ar. 1021)
ENG
Ramadan Kareem
A look at Muslim religion and Arab society

Alexander the Great in Islam. From Greek Conqueror to Muslim Prophet.

Sam Thrope, Ph.D., The National Library of Israel

Alexander the Great’s conquest of the known world lasted only eleven years from 334 to 323 BCE, but the legacy of that almost unbelievable achievement—building an empire stretching from Greece to India before the age of thirty—continued to reverberate throughout the centuries.

In the Islamic sphere, the portrayal of Alexander took a surprising and unexpected turn. Alexander’s figure is already hinted at in the Qur’an in the description of the “two-horned one." However, the later tradition, especially the work of medieval Persian poets, gives us an Alexander driven not by conquest but by justice; having attained perfect philosophical wisdom, the Macedonian warrior became a monotheistic prophet. This lecture will discuss the changing figure of Alexander from ancient Greece to Medieval Iran.

Samuel Thrope is the Curator of the Islam and Middle East Collection at the National Library of Israel. Born and raised in Arlington, Massachusetts, Thrope earned his PhD at the University of California, Berkeley, and has taught at the Hebrew University. His latest book is a translation, with Domenico Agostini, of the Zoroastrian creation myth the Bundahishn.

Mon
25.4.2022
20:00
Online Event
Zoom
Free of charge
Free

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